The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans are finally here.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are released every five years. These guidelines are written mostly for policymakers and health professionals. But it becomes a foundational document for nutrition guidelines implemented at schools, for example, and guidance for clinicians, and therefore should be of interest to everyone. Perhaps more embattled than any other release, the consensus on these new guidelines seems to be that not much has changed since their previous release in 2010. Here is the link to the updated guidelines: 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

 Chapter 2: Food Category Sources of Added Sugars in the U.S. Population Ages 2 Years and Older

Chapter 2: Food Category Sources of Added Sugars in the U.S. Population Ages 2 Years and Older

This lengthy document also offers a snapshot of our current diet as a population, in addition to advising on where it should be going. It conveys this information in as many charts and infographics as possible. The chart to the right shows the sources of added sugar in our diet per food category. No surprise that 47% of added sugars come from the Beverages category, with 39% from sodas, sugary fruit drinks (which does not include 100% fruit juice), and sports drinks. This amounts to more added sugars from the beverages we drink than from desserts (Snacks and Sweets on the chart).  

Additional commentary on the new guidelines:

Marian Nestle on her blog Food Politics:  The 2015 Dietary Guidelines, at long last and The 2015 Dietary Guidelines hidden advice about sugary drinks

By Jane Brody in the NYTimes: What's New in the Dietary Guidelines

Here is my previous post about the drafting of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines: Sneak Peak DGA 2015